May 26, 2016: Meeting kids’ needs through high school options

Belmont Citizen-Herald: May 26, 2016

Belmont High School is moving toward the end of another spectacularly successful school year.  Academic accomplishment remains high, with graduating seniors headed toward four-year colleges.  The theatre program hit a home run with the presentation of The Laramie Project.  Athletics excelled, with the girls basketball team enthralling fans with their deep tournament run.  Music, community service, after-school clubs, even new coding classes to advance technology education.  Belmont High offers something for everyone, right?

Well, maybe not quite.

I had conversations recently with two Belmont educators about the advantages of the high school options that Belmont offers within our community.  The question I posed was not in the negative (what does Belmont High not do well), but rather in the positive (what advantages does the community receive from having more than one high school). Both educators agreed that Belmont was well-served by having these options.

Dan Richards, principal of Belmont High School, noted that education provided by public high schools involves a reflection not only of the community, but of society as a whole.  One societal norm to be reflected today, Richards said, is the expectation that things be customized. “One can go on the internet and customize jackets and shoes for individual tastes. That expectation now extends to public education as well.”

Belmont High can, to a point, teach to differentiating learners, Richards said.  One difference between Belmont and other towns, he said, is that Belmont’s public schools don’t simply talk about that as an abstract principle, but “actively embrace that notion” to guide what is done “inside the bricks” (i.e., within the school walls).  The problem, he said, is that despite best efforts, Belmont High cannot “fabricate all environments for students to thrive in.” In that sense, Belmont High cannot completely meet society’s expectations. Accordingly, having different schools that provide different education environments can only do good for the community.

Providing an opportunity for an alternative high school experience is what Belmont’s Waldorf High School offers.  According to Waldorf High Director Mara White, while many Belmont residents are not even aware of the small independent school tucked away on Lexington Ave., WHS graduated its first class in 2000 and moved to Belmont in 2004.

White speaks the same language as BHS principal Richards.  “It is evident,” she says, “that one system cannot serve the needs of every single student.  A student might thrive in one place and not in the other. A student who does very well at BHS might not flourish at Waldorf” and vice versa.

The objective of Waldorf High School is the same as any high school education. “We seek,” White says, “to help students develop the intellectual capacity to think critically and to maneuver in society and with each other.”  Belmont High and Waldorf seek to “teach the same skill sets to students,” White emphasizes.

The size of the Waldorf is the “most obvious difference” between the two schools, White says. “Whether it is sports or music or drama, Waldorf provides the opportunity to participate. You may not be the best soccer player, but you  can still experience being part of a team and engaging in competition.”  In addition, “students do not receive an individualized education program, but the school attends to individualized needs.”

Obviously, Belmont High and Waldorf High are not the only two high schools serving Belmont residents. They do, however, illustrate an important lesson. As we approach the completion of another school year, additional celebration is merited by the fact that Belmont supports a variety of local opportunities to provide a successful education to our kids, whatever their needs.  Not all communities can say that.

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